Sepia Saturday 278: Photos in Need of Care and Attention

The focus for this week’s project is on images that are past their best or in need of a little care and attention.

It’s so good to be back at Sepia Saturday. I’ve missed not only sharing — but also viewing — the images of times past that are the heart and soul of this blog. I’ve been learning more about blogging, brushing up on my documentation techniques, learning new software, viewing webinars, general housekeeping that comes with blogging. But I simply must make time to participate in this venture. Most of the entries (mine included) are genealogy-related. But I really enjoy viewing and sharing images that are “outside of the box” so to speak. They’re the images that afford genealogists a break from the mundane pedigrees, family group sheets, biologies, etc. It’s just a welcome end to a week that may have included intense research, reading, studying, etc.

I see I missed a good one last week. But, true to the Sepia Saturday scheme of things, being the opportunist that I am, I think I can segue what could’ve been an SS 277 entry into SS 278. Watch and learn. Yes, I had to strike that as well because I know y’all do it too. I think I’ll limit my images to two portraits and two snapshots.

This is a faded portrait of my Daddy, William Emmet PALMER, in his high school lettermen's (football) sweater. Circa 1930, Gary, Indiana.  Original in possession of author.

This is a faded portrait of my Daddy, William Emmet PALMER, in his high school lettermen’s (football) sweater. Circa 1930, Gary, Indiana. Original in possession of author.

I’ll go ahead and lead off with the aforementioned missed entry. It’s a faded portrait of my Daddy, William Emmet PALMER, in his high school lettermen’s (football) sweater. Because I graduated from his alma mater (Roosevelt High School &
Indiana) , I know the “R” on the front of the sweater was gold. So, even though the photograph is sepia, in my mind’s eye, it’s grey and gold. Long live the black and gold. Panther Pride!!

This is a composite of my mother's and my graduation photos.  We both graduated from Roosevelt High School in Gary, Indiana in 1931 and 1967 respectively.

This is a composite of my mother’s and my graduation photos. We both graduated from Roosevelt High School in Gary, Indiana in 1931 and 1967 respectively.

My second portrait is actually a two-fer because I’ve created a collage of my Mom’s and my graduation photos. Three corners of hers are missing. I think they got folded and ultimately became separated from the photo. The fading of my portrait began lonnnnng ago. In fact I recall being disappointed when I opened the envelope from the photographer. It was developed much lighter than I was expecting. I was looking for a full-color photo. Despite his development process, it has stood the test of time for the most part.

For the snapshots — wow there are so many in need of a little care and attention. Okay, I’ll go with this snapshot of my Mom, Floretta Violet MABLE, and all her siblings circa 1970 (based on my uncles’ afro hairstyles). The composition was the eight of them in the same positions they were in for a photo they took as children (circa 1935). I came up with that year because my mother (the oldest, born in 1915) was a teen or young adult in the photo and my youngest uncle (born circa 1933) was a toddler in knee pants. It’s so cute. I’ll have to get it from Jay. No doubt you’ll recognize that it’s a Polaroid. We all have more than a fair share of specimens from this genre of photography.

This is a snapshot of my Mom, Floretta Violet MABLE, and all her siblings circa 1970.    The composition was the eight of them in the same positions they were in for a photo they took as children (circa 1935)  The ninth person is a grandchild that raised with them as a sibling.  The original is in possession of my cousin, Jay Evans of Gary.

This is a snapshot of my Mom, Floretta Violet MABLE, and all her siblings circa 1960. The composition was the eight of them in the same positions they were in for a photo they took as children (circa 1935) The ninth person is a grandchild that raised with them as a sibling. The original is in possession of my cousin, Jay Evans of Gary.

Oh, and I also wanted to mention that there are some generous members of facebook groups who share their talents by offering to restore photos for other members. One randomly calls for photos in need of restoration then posts before and after images of his work. It’s really quite remarkable. I haven’t availed myself of his generosity yet; but I have a few potential projects for him.

Welp! That’s my offering for this week’s theme. Any genealogist worth his salt is bound to have similar misfortunes among his photo archives. I’ll be watching for yours. And don’t be surprised if some of your older posts get revived by my comments. I have no shame; and will take some time to go back and see what I’ve missed. Have a great week!

See other Sepians’ worse-for-wear photos.

Sep_Sat_2015_0509

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16 thoughts on “Sepia Saturday 278: Photos in Need of Care and Attention

  1. Good to see you! I hate the old poloroids. The black and white ones fro the 1950s have worn worse than the colored ones from the 1970s. I think the fixitive they used on those early ones really did them no good. I have a couple I could have used for this prompt if I had remembered it!

    Finding Eliza

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  2. Oh the Polaroid. I remember when we got our Polaroid camera and we could take AND develop a picture on the spot — we thought we really had something. I see how dark those photos are getting and wonder how many more years before the faces and stories are totally GONE.

    It’s funny how you can remember a detail like the color of the letterman’s sweater. A friend sent me a photo from 1962 – black and white, of course. The minute I saw it, I said – Oh, there are my red Trotters. Those were my favorite shoes.

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    • Yes, it seems the Polaroid turned out to be a novelty. Even back then, “serious photographers” avoided its use. We had one that the family members could use; but only my Daddy used “the good camera.” I remember waiting for the photo to emerge and having to grasp it “just so” to keep from smudging it. LOL!

      You’re so right about knowing the colors of a black and white photo. I have one of myself at about age 12. I know the dress I wore had flowers with turquoise straps that tied at the shoulders. Thanks for visiting my post.

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  3. You have great eyesight to see an “R” on the front of your father’s sweater! I wonder if your mom’s graduation photo has been in an album with corners to hold the photo in place, then was removed, weakening those corners and they broke. She’s very beautiful.

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    • LOL! I’ve just had it so long that I remember them saying it was there. Now, whenever I look at the picture, I look for the “R” like I want to make sure it’s still there. I’m sure that’s happened to the corners of the photo. I’m going to make another restoration attempt. That ribbon is a challenge. Thank you.

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  4. Pingback: My Mother’s Day Tribute – 2015 | Daughter of Slave Ancestry

  5. There’s no doubt about it – you ARE your mother’s daughter! Such a wonderful resemblance & both of you quite beautiful. Nice collaging!

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  6. Excellent post! You should definitely give that guy you referred to a try with your family polaroid, and I might have a look for him myself to restore my uncle’s baby photo (see my blog this week). Any more clues re his name or the group he’s part of would be much appreciated, please.

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    • The gentleman I mentioned in my post is named, Terry Walker . He randomly offers his services free of charge in the Afrigeneas African American Genealogy Community facebook group. Understandably, he sets a limit on how many requests he will honor (I’ve seen as many as five) and sets a deadline, i.e. for requests he receives within the next hour (or whatever available time he has).

      On Friday, I joined Genealogist’s Photo Restoration Group. The difference with this one is that you don’t have to wait for someone to solicit requests. You can post the image you need restored and ask for help. I imagine you could request a specific person once you become familiar with his work. After joining, you can view the “before” and “after” examples.

      I hope this helps.

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  7. I wasn’t sure about this weekend’s Sepia theme, but I’ve enjoyed seeing everyone’s treasures that like yours have a sentimental value far beyond the photo’s quality. Recently I discovered a box of Polaroid film and a vintage 1980s Polaroid camera in my dad’s camera collection which I have inherited. It was easily 15 years old and amazingly the power pack still had a charge. The chemicals however gave only a very ghostly yellow grey image. It’s a technology that has become more obsolete than anyone expected. At least the photos survive.

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  8. Wow…do you look like your mother!! The composite of the two pictures is wonderful. I have one whole album full of polaroids my uncle took probably right after he bought it. There are five or six pictures of their TV, a dozen or so of the cat etc.,etc. He was obviously smitten with the technology. Blogging and “keeping” up is an endless job isn’t it?

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